Category: propaganda

Has DHS become the Nations police force?

I read this article and was both amazed and scared at the implications of what this means. If you buy into the idea that the US has become a police state. With the NSA basically wielding unconstitutional powers to spy and track ALL Americans then we can assume that DHS is indeed the nations police force.

“A standing military force, with an overgrown Executive will not long be safe companions to liberty.”—James Madison

“Here [in New Mexico], we are moving more toward a national police force. Homeland Security is involved with a lot of little things around town. Somebody in Washington needs to call a timeout.”—Dan Klein, retired Albuquerque Police Department sergeant

If the United States is a police state, then the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is its national police force, with all the brutality, ineptitude and corruption such a role implies. In fact, although the DHS’ governmental bureaucracy may at times appear to be inept and bungling, it is ruthlessly efficient when it comes to building what the Founders feared most—a standing army on American soil.

The third largest federal agency behind the Departments of Veterans Affairs and Defense, the DHS—with its 240,000 full-time workers, $61 billion budget and sub-agencies that include the Coast Guard, Customs and Border Protection, Secret Service, Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)—has been aptly dubbed a “runaway train.”

In the 12 years since it was established to “prevent terrorist attacks within the United States,” the DHS has grown from a post-9/11 knee-jerk reaction to a leviathan with tentacles in every aspect of American life. With good reason, a bipartisan bill to provide greater oversight and accountability into the DHS’ purchasing process has been making its way through Congress.

A better plan would be to abolish the DHS altogether. In making the case for shutting down the de facto national police agency, analyst Charles Kenny offers the following six reasons: one, the agency lacks leadership; two, terrorism is far less of a threat than it is made out to be; three, the FBI has actually stopped more alleged terrorist attacks than DHS; four, the agency wastes exorbitant amounts of money with little to show for it; five, “An overweight DHS gets a free pass to infringe civil liberties without a shred of economic justification”; and six, the agency is just plain bloated.

article on DHS

What Internet does NASA use?

Saw this interesting article on Wired today. NASA uses a different internet than us mortal citizens. NASA has download speeds of 91MB a second. We can only hope as citizens for speeds of around 2 or 3 MB a second currently.

I am posting this because I think the technology is interesting.

When Google chief financial officer Patrick Pichette said the tech giant might bring 10 gigabits per second internet connections to American homes, it seemed like science fiction. That’s about 1,000 times faster than today’s home connections. But for NASA, it’s downright slow.

While the rest of us send data across the public internet, the space agency uses a shadow network called ESnet, short for Energy Science Network, a set of private pipes that has demonstrated cross-country data transfers of 91 gigabits per second–the fastest of its type ever reported.

NASA isn’t going bring these speeds to homes, but it is using this super-fast networking technology to explore the next wave of computing applications. ESnet is a test bed where scientists can explore new ideas before setting them loose on the commercial internet, and it’s an important tool for researchers who deal in massive amounts of data generated by projects such as the Large Hadron Collider and the Human Genome Project. Rather sending hard disks back and forth through the mail, they can trade data via the ultra-fast network, which is run by the Department of Energy.

In short, ESnet a window into what our computing world will eventually look like. “Our vision for the world is that scientific discovery shouldn’t be constrained by geography,” says ESnet director Gregory Bell.

NASAs internet

Has NSA bulk surveillance even stopped anything at all? Even a single attack? Or is it a plan to spy on everyone as I claim it is.

I knew Gen. Alexander was lying when he said that the NSA has stopped 50 attacks based on information picked up by their illegal bulk surveillance dragnet. The fact Alexander and Clapper are walking around after blatantly lying to Congress is totally an affront to anyone with any intelligence. If I lied to Congress… and they figured it out. I would be picked up and arrested that day.

 

On June 5, 2013, the Guardian broke the first story in what would become a flood of revelations regarding the extent and nature of the NSA’s surveillance programs.  Facing an uproar over the threat such programs posed to privacy, the Obama administration scrambled to defend them as legal and essential to U.S. national security and counterterrorism. Two weeks after the first leaks by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden were published, President Obama defended the NSA surveillance programs during a visit to Berlin, saying: “We know of at least 50 threats that have been averted because of this information not just in the United States, but, in some cases, threats here in Germany. So lives have been saved.”  Gen. Keith Alexander, the director of the NSA, testified before Congress that: “the information gathered from these programs provided the U.S. government with critical leads to help prevent over 50 potential terrorist events in more than 20 countries around the world.”  Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.), chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, said on the House floor in July that “54 times [the NSA programs] stopped and thwarted terrorist attacks both here and in Europe – saving real lives.”

However, our review of the government’s claims about the role that NSA “bulk” surveillance of phone and email communications records has had in keeping the United States safe from terrorism shows that these claims are overblown and even misleading.  An in-depth analysis of 225 individuals recruited by al-Qaeda or a like-minded group or inspired by al-Qaeda’s ideology, and charged in the United States with an act of terrorism since 9/11, demonstrates that traditional investigative methods, such as the use of informants, tips from local communities, and targeted intelligence operations, provided the initial impetus for investigations in the majority of cases, while the contribution of NSA’s bulk surveillance programs to these cases was minimal. Indeed, the controversial bulk collection of American telephone metadata, which includes the telephone numbers that originate and receive calls, as well as the time and date of those calls but not their content, under Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act, appears to have played an identifiable role in initiating, at most, 1.8 percent of these cases. NSA programs involving the surveillance of non-U.S. persons outside of the United States under Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act played a role in 4.4 percent of the terrorism cases we examined, and NSA surveillance under an unidentified authority played a role in 1.3 percent of the cases we examined.
Regular FISA warrants not issued in connection with Section 215 or Section 702, which are the traditional means for investigating foreign persons, were used in at least 48 (21 percent) of the cases we looked at, although it’s unclear whether these warrants played an initiating role or were used at a later point in the investigation. (Click on the link to go to a database of all 225 individuals, complete with additional details about them and the government’s investigations of these cases
Sickening.. Pathetic. Welcome to the Machine.
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How badly are we being manipulated. The 4 d ‘s Deny , Disrupt, Degrade, Deceive

First for something cool The Brilliant Cube. Location South Korea. Brilliant Cube on Vimeo : http://vimeo.com/m/77023605 Brilliant Cube GCHQ and NSA with the other five eyes partners will stop at nothing to ruin your reputation Besides from the NSA and GCHQ and five eyes other … Continue reading How badly are we being manipulated. The 4 d ‘s Deny , Disrupt, Degrade, Deceive

Amazon central to Drone Strikes on Americans. Sniper time. Secret Space plane. Cryptography and it’s value.

I am off this afternoon and usually do not blog this much. I really started the blog to talk about Backgammon and the Indianapolis Colts. I never thought anyone would ever read it… I instead starting writing about things that interest me. Drones, History, Foreign … Continue reading Amazon central to Drone Strikes on Americans. Sniper time. Secret Space plane. Cryptography and it’s value.

You are not alone.

It has been a minute since I posted. I was moving… Had a blizzard and my Car broke down.

There has been a ton of information about the NSA recently. Have only minutes to do this… It crosses my mind some of what they supposedly can do might be propaganda to make Russia and China etc… Believe we can do it.

Running list of NSA capabilities

“It can track the numbers of both parties on a phone call, as well location, time and duration. (More)
It can hack Chinese phones and text messages. (More)
It can set up fake internet cafes. (More)
It can spy on foreign leaders’ cell phones. (More)
It can tap underwater fiber-optic cables. (More)
It can track communication within media organizations like Al Jazeera. (More)
It can hack into the UN video conferencing system. (More)
It can track bank transactions. (More)
It can monitor text messages. (More)
It can access your email, chat, and web browsing history. (More)
It can map your social networks. (More)
It can access your smartphone app data. (More)
It is trying to get into secret networks like Tor, diverting users to less secure channels. (More)
It can go undercover within embassies to have closer access to foreign networks. (More)
It can set up listening posts on the roofs of buildings to monitor communications in a city. (More)
It can set up a fake LinkedIn. (More)
It can track the reservations at upscale hotels. (More)
It can intercept the talking points for Ban Ki-moon’s meeting with Obama. (More)
It can crack cellphone encryption codes. (More)
It can hack computers that aren’t connected to the internet using radio waves. (More)
It can intercept phone calls by setting up fake base stations. (More)
It can remotely access a computer by setting up a fake wireless connection. (More)
It can install fake SIM cards to then control a cell phone. (More)
It can fake a USB thumb drive that’s actually a monitoring device. (More)
It can crack all types of sophisticated computer encryption. (Update: It is trying to build this capability.) (More)
It can go into online games and monitor communication. (More)
It can intercept communications between aircraft and airports. (More)
(Update) It can physically intercept deliveries, open packages, and make changes to devices. (More) (h/t)”

NSA capabilities

Again .. This is what we know of. It is most likely 1/100th of what they can do.

NSA stealing your text messages


The National Security Agency has collected almost 200 million text messages a day from across the globe, using them to extract data including location, contact networks and credit card details, according to top-secret documents.
The untargeted collection and storage of SMS messages – including their contacts – is revealed in a joint investigation between the Guardian and the UK’s Channel 4 News based on material provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.
The documents also reveal the UK spy agency GCHQ has made use of the NSA database to search the metadata of “untargeted and unwarranted” communications belonging to people in the UK.
The NSA program, codenamed Dishfire, collects “pretty much everything it can”, according to GCHQ documents, rather than merely storing the communications of existing surveillance targets.
The NSA has made extensive use of its vast text message database to extract information on people’s travel plans, contact books, financial transactions and more – including of individuals under no suspicion of illegal activity.
An agency presentation from 2011 – subtitled “SMS Text Messages: A Goldmine to Exploit” – reveals the program collected an average of 194 million text messages a day in April of that year. In addition to storing the messages themselves, a further program known as “Prefer” conducted automated analysis on the untargeted communications. ”

Texts stolen by NSA

Secret war being fought in 135 Countries worldwide and counting

This is almost more scary to me then the NSA disclosures… Either way it should give you chills up and down your spine.

They operate in the green glow of night vision in Southwest Asia and stalk through the jungles of South America. They snatch men from their homes in the Maghreb and shoot it out with heavily armed militants in the Horn of Africa. They feel the salty spray while skimming over the tops of waves from the turquoise Caribbean to the deep blue Pacific. They conduct missions in the oppressive heat of Middle Eastern deserts and the deep freeze of Scandinavia. All over the planet, the Obama administration is waging a secret war whose full extent has never been fully revealed — until now.

Since September 11, 2001, U.S. Special Operations forces have grown in every conceivable way, from their numbers to their budget. Most telling, however, has been the exponential rise in special ops deployments globally. This presence — now, in nearly 70% of the world’s nations — provides new evidence of the size and scope of a secret war being waged from Latin America to the backlands of Afghanistan, from training missions with African allies to information operations launched in cyberspace.

In the waning days of the Bush presidency, Special Operations forces were reportedly deployed in about 60 countries around the world. By 2010, that number had swelled to 75, according to Karen DeYoung and Greg Jaffe of the Washington Post. In 2011, Special Operations Command (SOCOM) spokesman Colonel Tim Nye told TomDispatch that the total would reach 120. Today, that figure has risen higher still.

In 2013, elite U.S. forces were deployed in 134 countries around the globe, according to Major Matthew Robert Bockholt of SOCOM Public Affairs. This 123% increase during the Obama years demonstrates how, in addition to conventional wars and a CIA drone campaign, public diplomacy and extensive electronic spying, the U.S. has engaged in still another significant and growing form of overseas power projection. Conducted largely in the shadows by America’s most elite troops, the vast majority of these missions take place far from prying eyes, media scrutiny, or any type of outside oversight, increasing the chances of unforeseen blowback and catastrophic consequences.

Growth Industry

Formally established in 1987, Special Operations Command has grown steadily in the post-9/11 era. SOCOM is reportedly on track to reach 72,000 personnel in 2014, up from 33,000 in 2001. Funding for the command has also jumped exponentially as its baseline budget, $2.3 billion in 2001, hit $6.9 billion in 2013 ($10.4 billion, if you add in supplemental funding). Personnel deployments abroad have skyrocketed, too, from 4,900 “man-years” in 2001 to 11,500 in 2013.

A recent investigation by TomDispatch, using open source government documents and news releases as well as press reports, found evidence that U.S. Special Operations forces were deployed in or involved with the militaries of 106 nations around the world in 2012-2013. For more than a month during the preparation of that article, however, SOCOM failed to provide accurate statistics on the total number of countries to which special operators — Green Berets and Rangers, Navy SEALs and Delta Force commandos, specialized helicopter crews, boat teams, and civil affairs personnel — were deployed. “We don’t just keep it on hand,” SOCOM’s Bockholt explained in a telephone interview once the article had been filed. “We have to go searching through stuff. It takes a long time to do that.” Hours later, just prior to publication, he provided an answer to a question I first asked in November of last year. “SOF [Special Operations forces] were deployed to 134 countries” during fiscal year 2013, Bockholt explained in an email.”

OPS active in 134 Countries and counting

What can possibly go wrong?

Have to run.. Stay informed. Be wary. Protect yourself from Govt intrusion by any means available. This is advice for everyone including and most specifically for those doing nothing wrong.

Quick ideas:
BlackSMS
Enlocked Email
Wickr
DuckDuckGo search engine
Riseup email service.

https://imgflip.com/i/66qpd

Take care be safe.